Breast Augmentation
 

Breast augmentation, also called augmentation mammaplasty, involves surgical placement of an implant behind each breast to increase its volume and enhance its shape. Often, after weight loss, childbirth, or as a result of aging, the breasts lose volume and their shape changes. Also, many women choose to have their breasts enlarged in order to satisfy their desire for a fuller bustline. Breast augmentation can be performed at any age after the breasts are developed.

Breast implants are medical devices with a solid silicone, rubber shell. The implant shell may be filled with either saline solution (sterile salt water) or elastic silicone gel. Both saline and silicone gel breast implants approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Approval means that an implant has been rigorously researched and tested, and reviewed by an independent panel of physicians for safety.

The choice of implant filler, implant size, shape and other features will be determined based on your breast anatomy, body type and your desired increase in size. Your lifestyle, goals and personal preferences, as well Dr. Chicarilli's recommendations and sound surgical judgment are also determining factors. Implant manufacturers occasionally introduce new styles and types of implants, and therefore there may be additional options available to you.

The size of a breast implant is measured in cubic centimeters (ccs) based on the volume of the saline or silicone filler. Breast implants vary both by filler and in size, but there are additional features to consider:

  • Texture: the implant shell may be smooth or textured

  • Shape: the implant may have a round profile or one that is anatomic (teardrop or tapered shape)

  • Profile: the implant may have a low, medium or high projection (the depth of the implant from the base to the highest point of the implant curve)

  • Diameter: the width of the implant measured across it's base (the side of the implant that will be positioned over the chest wall

Adult women of any age can benefit greatly from the enhancement breast implants provide. It is usually recommended, however, that a woman's breasts are fully developed prior to placement of breast implants. Saline implants are FDA approved for augmentation in women 18 years of age and older. Silicone implants are FDA approved for augmentation in women age 22 and older. Saline or silicone implants may be recommended at a younger age if used for reconstruction purposes.

The data on implant longevity is variable.  Implant leakage is usually caused by a leak in the valve area.  Other causes of implant failure include a tear, hole or rip in the implant, this can occur over time.  If a saline implant leaks, the salt water gets absorbed by the body with no adverse effects.  Many women can get a lifetime out of their implants with no exchange needed, but it is best to think that you may need an implant exchange at sometime in your life.  Implant leakage reports between 1 to 5% per year.

Returning to work, given the employment does not require heavy lifting or strain, can normally occur after a week. The breast augmentation recovery period should be planned out appropriately based on the patient's life schedule.  Allowing enough time for this process to occur, and failing to rush the process of a breast augmentation recovery period can allow for more pleasing results in the end.  Straining and trying to rush the breast augmentation recovery process can cause for damage and a significantly longer breast augmentation recovery time in the end.

 



Breast Reduction
 

Breast reduction, technically known as reduction mammaplasty, is designed for such women. The procedure removes fat, glandular tissue, and skin from the breasts, making them smaller, lighter, and firmer. It can also reduce the size of the areola, the darker skin surrounding the nipple. The goal is to give the woman smaller, better-shaped breasts in proportion with the rest of her body.

Breast reduction is usually performed for physical relief rather than simply cosmetic improvement. Most women who have the surgery are troubled by very large, sagging breasts that restrict their activities and cause them physical discomfort.

In most cases, breast reduction isn't performed until a woman's breasts are fully developed; however, it can be done earlier if large breasts are causing serious physical discomfort. The best candidates are those who are mature enough to fully understand the procedure and have realistic expectations about the results. Breast reduction is not recommended for women who intend to breast-feed.



Breast Lift
 

Over time, the effects of gravity along with the loss of the skin's natural elasticity begins to have an effect on the appearance of a woman's breasts. These factors, combined with pregnancies and nursing will often cause the breasts to lose their youthful shape and firmness.

A breastlift, or mastopexy, is a surgical procedure to raise and reshape sagging breasts. The procedure can also reduce the size of the areola (the darker skin surrounding the nipple). Breast implants inserted in conjunction with a mastopexy procedure can increase both firmness and size.

 

Breast Reconstruction
 

Reconstruction of a breast that has been removed due to cancer or other disease is one of the most rewarding surgical procedures available today. New medical techniques and devices have made it possible for surgeons to create a breast that can come close in form and appearance to matching a natural breast. Frequently, reconstruction is possible immediately following breast removal (mastectomy), so the patient wakes up with a breast mound already in place, having been spared the experience of seeing herself with no breast at all. But bear in mind, post-mastectomy breast reconstruction is not a simple procedure. There are often many options to consider. This information will give you a basic understanding of the procedure -- when it's appropriate, how it's done, and what results you can expect. It can't answer all of your questions, since a lot depends on your individual circumstances.

The best candidates, are women whose cancer, as far as can be determined, seems to have been eliminated by mastectomy.  Still, there are legitimate reasons to wait. Many women aren't comfortable weighing all the options while they're struggling to cope with a diagnosis of cancer. Others simply don't want to have any more surgery than is absolutely necessary. Some patients may be advised by their surgeons to wait, particularly if the breast is being rebuilt in a more complicated procedure using flaps of skin and underlying tissue. Women with other health conditions, such as obesity, high blood pressure, or smoking, may also be advised to wait.  In any case, being informed of your reconstruction options before surgery can help you prepare for a mastectomy with a more positive outlook for the future.
 

 

Gynecomastia
 

Gynecomastia is a medical term that comes from the Greek words for "women-like breasts." Though this oddly named condition is rarely talked about, it's actually quite common. Gynecomastia affects an estimated 40 to 60 percent of men. It may affect only one breast or both. Though certain drugs and medical problems have been linked with male breast overdevelopment, there is no known cause in the vast majority of cases.

For men who feel self-conscious about their appearance, breast-reduction surgery can help. The procedure removes fat and or glandular tissue from the breasts, and in extreme cases removes excess skin, resulting in a chest that is flatter, firmer, and better contoured.

Surgery to correct Gynecomastia can be performed on healthy, emotionally stable men of any age. The best candidates for surgery have firm, elastic skin that will reshape to the body's new contours.

Surgery may be discouraged for obese men, or for overweight men who have not first attempted to correct the problem with exercise or weight loss. Also, individuals who drink alcohol beverages in excess or smoke marijuana are usually not considered good candidates for surgery. These drugs, along with anabolic steroids, may cause Gynecomastia. Therefore, patients are first directed to stop the use of these drugs to see if the breast fullness will diminish before surgery is considered an option.

Whether you've had excision with a scalpel or liposuction, you will feel some discomfort for a few days after surgery. However, discomfort can be controlled with medications if necessary. 

You'll be swollen and bruised for awhile--in fact, you may wonder if there's been any improvement at all. To help reduce swelling, you'll probably be instructed to wear an elastic pressure garment continuously for a week or two, and for a few weeks longer at night. Although the worst of your swelling will dissipate in the first few weeks, it may be three months or more before the final results of your surgery are apparent.

In the meantime, it is important to begin getting back to normal. You'll be encouraged to begin walking around on the day of surgery, and can return to work when you feel well enough--which could be as early as a day or two after surgery. Any stitches will generally be removed about 1 to 2 weeks following the procedure.

Dr. Chicarilli may advise you to avoid sexual activity for a week or two, and heavy exercise for about three weeks. You'll be told to stay away from any sport or job that risks a blow to the chest area for at least four weeks. In general, it will take about a month before you're back to all of your normal activities.

You should also avoid exposing the resulting scars to the sun for at least six months. Sunlight can permanently affect the skin's pigmentation, causing the scar to turn dark. If sun exposure is unavoidable, use a strong sunblock.

 

 

 





 
  Facelift
  Eyelid Surgery
  Neck Lift
  Rhinoplasty
  Chin Augmentation
  Breast Augmentation
  Breast Reduction
  Breast Lift
  Gynecomastia
  Breast Reconstruction
  Tummy Tuck
  Liposuction
  Lower Body Lift
  Arm Lift
   

 

  BOTOX® Cosmetic
  Restylane®
   
   
   

 


For questions or to schedule an appointment please call (203)453-7766
Zeno Chicarilli M.D.
5 Durham Road, Suite 1A Guilford, CT 06473

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